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DeepSoul Salutes Fats Domino: "Everybody's Got Something To Hide Except Me and My Monkey"

The final installment of our salute to the rock pioneer spotlights a fun Beatles cover.
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During their heyday (and into the solo years), the Beatles often professed their love of Fats Domino. Songs such as "Lady Madonna" can be directly traced to the rock 'n' roll architect's influence. During a New Orleans stop on their 1964 tour, the Beatles had one request: they wanted to meet their idol. After the meeting, Domino later repaid the favor by covering three of their tunes: "Lady Madonna," "Lovely Rita," and his ebullient rendition of "Everybody's Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey." While covering the Beatles is often fraught with difficulty, Domino manages to incorporate his

DeepSoul Salutes Fats Domino: "Blue Monday"

Our salute to the R&B pioneer continues with a 1956 classic first introduced in a seminal rock film.
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Rolling Stone calls it the "working man's blues," and "Blue Monday" does demonstrate rock's indebtedness to the genre. While Fats Domino did not write the track--he was not even the first to record it--he transformed the song into a memorable blend of rock, blues, country, and New Orleans jazz. What results is a track addressing a subject with which most listeners can relate, along with a dose of good-natured naughtiness. Domino's longtime collaborator Dave Bartholomew originally penned "Blue Monday" for New Orleans R&B singer/guitarist Smiley Lewis. Released as a single in 1954, this version prominently features rhythm guitars, horns, and

DeepSoul Salutes Fats Domino: "I Hear You Knocking"

This week's DeepSoul is the first in a three-part salute to the rock and roll pioneer.
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One of the early architects of rock and roll, Fats Domino combined R&B with New Orleans swagger to create a feel-good but raunchy form of music. Lyrics such as "I found my thrill on Blueberry Hill" leave little doubt as to the nature of that thrill, but Domino's radiant smile and rollicking piano never offended. A huge part of rock history was lost upon his October 24, 2017 death. but his timeless catalog will remain for new fans to discover. This week's DeepSoul is the first in a three-part salute to the music pioneer. Born in the Big Easy in

DeepSoul: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers - "Breakdown"

Tom Petty, soul artist? His first hit single melds elements of R&B with rock and blues, making the track a standout in his catalog.
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The music world has been mourning the loss of Tom Petty, the iconic rock artist who died from cardiac arrest on October 2. What few critics and fans have discussed, however, is that Petty's sound encompassed genres besides rock, namely blues, country, and folk. Another major influence that has been little explored is R&B, and that element permeates his first hit, 1976's "Breakdown." Its dominant drums, bass, and keyboards along with Petty's snarling narrative of a deteriorating love affair makes "Breakdown" sound like no other song in Petty's catalog. Coming off the breakup of his band Mudcrutch, Petty formed a

DeepSoul: Stargard - "Which Way Is Up"

A slice of late '70s funk/disco, "Which Way Is Up" remains an underrated track by an unjustly neglected group.
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A slice of late 70s funk/disco, "Which Way Is Up" remains an underrated track by an unjustly neglected act: Stargard. A female trio who drew comparisons to Labelle (particularly through their flamboyant costumes) and the Pointer Sisters, they achieved only one hit with the theme song to the 1977 Richard Pryor vehicle Which Way Is Up? Their blend of R&B, funk, and gospel should have achieved more success, but their lack of smash followup led to their 1983 breakup. The original lineup consisted of Rochelle Runnells, Debra Anderson and Janice Williams, and their more gritty, aggressive vocal approach led to

DeepSoul: Herbie Hancock - "Chameleon"

The jazz pioneer impacted modern hip hop, r&b, and funk in this 1973 classic.
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Herbie Hancock may be a renowned jazz master, but he also influenced early hip hop and contemporary R&B. Most listeners can point to 1984's "Rockit" as the soundtrack for breakdancers, but his 1970s experiments in fusion led to an important track in the development of funk: 1973's "Chameleon." The corresponding album, Head Hunters, became not only Hancock's most successful album, but one of the bestselling jazz albums of all time. Along with collaborator and reedits Bernie Maupin, bassist Paul Jackson, drummer Harvey Mason, and percussionist Bill Summers, Hancock wrote material expanding the very concept of jazz. "I always enjoy working

DeepSoul: Bob and Earl - "Harlem Shuffle"

The 1963 single has experienced an unlikely resurgence of interest through covers, samples, and an appearance in a 2017 summer film.
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With its prominent use in the Summer 2017 film Baby Driver, "Harlem Shuffle" by Bob and Earl has gained renewed attention. The Rolling Stones previously scored a hit with their hit 1986 cover (featuring Bobby Womack on backing vocals), accompanied by its humorous Ralph Bakshi and John Kricfalusi-directed video. The 1963 original features not only a more soulful vocal performance but also funky horns and drums. Over 50 years later the question remains: just who were Bob and Earl? The duo originally consisted of Bobby Day and Earl Nelson (aka Jackie Lee), two singers who had previously recorded classics still

DeepSoul: The Temptations with Rick James - "Standing on the Top"

A funk superstar and a legendary Motown act team up to produce a 1980s R&B classic.
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The eighties may have brought changes in soul and R&B, but Motown music remained a favorite among baby boomers (the success of 1983's The Big Chill film and soundtrack proved this fact). In 1982, the Temptations returned to their original label, Motown, after a brief tenure with Atlantic; to celebrate, the then-current members reunited with three former lead singers: Eddie Kendricks, David Ruffin, and Dennis Edwards. Looking to make a comeback, the group teamed with a seemingly unlikely producer: Rick James, the "punk funk" artist who was then at the peak of his popularity. What emerged from this collaboration was

DeepSoul: Tank - "You're My Star"

This 2014 single demonstrates how old school R&B and modern hip hop can be merged to create timeless music.
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Long a valuable behind-the-scenes player, Tank has penned and produced hits for top R&B artists such as Dave Hollister, Charlie Wilson, Jamie Foxx, and Kelly Rowland. His underrated solo material, however, has received comparatively less attention. A fusion of classic R&B and hip hop, Tank's work further impresses with his malleable voice and catchy hooks. These elements are on full display on the 2014 single "You're My Star," a standout from the album Stronger. Born Durrell Babbs in Milwaukee, Wisconsin before later moving to Clinton, Maryland, Tank honed his singing skills in the church choir. He got his start as

DeepSoul Salutes Bill Withers: "Soul Shadows" (with the Crusaders)

The final entry in DeepSoul's salute to the legendary singer looks at one of the more obscure - and underrated - tracks in his catalog.
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By 1980, Bill Withers began collaborating with other artists; he subsequently scored one of the biggest hits of his career with 1981's "Just the Two of Us," a smooth track also featuring Grover Washington, Jr. A year before that single, however, Withers worked with the famed group the Crusaders on the track "Soul Shadows." The band's brand of smooth jazz-funk perfectly suits Wither's unadorned voice, resulting in a sophisticated song that should have received more attention upon its release. Due to ongoing disputes with his label Columbia, Withers was unable to record his own albums from 1979-1985. To remain in

DeepSoul Salutes Bill Withers: "Hello Like Before"

The 1975 ballad typifies the soul singer's deeply personal songwriting and vocal style.
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By 1975, Bill Withers was at a professional crossroads. His previous record label, Sussex, had collapsed, forcing him to sign with Columbia. While he subsequently released albums containing hits such as "Lovely Day" and "I Want to Spend the Night," Withers was unhappy with the label. He felt he had lost control over his material, thus in the late 70s/early 80s he focused on collaborations with the Crusaders and Grover Washington, Jr. After the unhappy experience recording 1985's Watching You Watching Me, Withers would depart Columbia and struggle with career direction. Before that stage, however, Withers seemed to be off

Celebrating Prince On His 59th Birthday

Remembering the iconic visionary and one of his greatest songs on what would have been his 59th birthday...
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"No, I don't think about gone. I just think about in the future when I don't want to speak in real time." Today is Prince's 59th birthday and it's impossible not to notice the massive void in the present tense since his passing. I was devastated at the news like millions around the world but a friend and fellow follower of His Purple Badness told me she was not going to be sad. Prince's music was filled with joy and had been a soundtrack to many a good time and great night and that wasn't how she was going

Remembering The Timeless, Generational Voice of Soundgarden's Chris Cornell

Soundgarden frontman passed away at age 52 after performance in Detroit...
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The world woke to the shocking news that Soundgarden lead singer Chris Cornell passed away at the age of 52 shortly after the band completed a concert in Detroit. I'm still processing this as are his family, loved ones, friends, and many millions of fans, and I still cannot get my head around it. The shockwaves continue to reverberate and I'm struck by the strange coincidence we are days away from the release of a deluxe edition of the Singles soundtrack, that not only captured a special moment in time much better than the film, but also showed us a

Outside The Tower of Song: Everybody Knows

A new series about the songs of Leonard Cohen begins with the song that introduced me to him...
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My introduction to Leonard Cohen is likely atypical to of that of his other ardent fans but I'm certain I'm not the only Gen X'er whose first encounter came courtesy of the 1990 film Pump Up The Volume starring Christian Slater. I'd never heard anything like "Everybody Knows." High school for me was mostly hair metal and the emerging underground grunge scene. My ears were accustomed to squalling guitars and shrieking vocals, piercing voices singing about decadence or men howling about alienation. Pulsing synth and oud flourishes (hell, I didn't know what an oud was!) could hardly have been more

DeepSoul Salutes Bill Withers: "Who Is He (and What Is He to You)?"

Infidelity, jealousy, and pain never sounded so good in this 1972 classic.
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Bill Withers may be known for feel-good hits such as "Lean on Me" and "Lovely Day," but he could also speak of the darker sides of love, namely jealousy and betrayal. His 1972 cut "Who Is He (and What Is He to You)?" stands as one of the finest in the soul genre, with an unforgettable bass line and guitar riff (along with quivering strings) creating a sense of paranoia along with sorrow. For his masterpiece album Still Bill, Withers wrote most of the material. One exception is "Who Is He," a collaboration with lyricist Stanley McKinney. McKinney may have

DeepSoul Salutes Bill Withers: "I Want to Spend the Night"

DeepSoul celebrates the organic soul of the "Lean on Me" singer, beginning with this sensual slow jam.
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Few artists embody the very essence of soul as much as Bill Withers, a consummate singer, songwriter, and musician. His lyrics are highly personal yet universal in theme, addressing romantic, political, and familial topics. Never oversinging, his voice can soar, only to descend into a grittiness that expresses deep emotion. He implemented his gospel roots, into his blending of soul and R&B (with a touch of folk), making Withers a standout among his peers in the 1970s. While Withers has largely retired from performing, his music is everywhere, still played on the radio, used in commercials, and incorporated into films.

DeepSoul, Sampled Edition: Timmy Thomas - "Why Can't We Live Together"

This 1973 hit features a one-man-band, and has inspired numerous covers and hip hop samples.
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AllMusic's Andrew Hamilton labels it "the cheapest Top Ten hit ever made." Regardless of its minimalist production, the 1973 single "Why Can't We Live Together" by Timmy Thomas ranks as one of the most unlikely and influential hits of the 1970s. Its hypnotic beat, Latin percussion, and heartfelt lyrics retain timeless appeal, with artists such as MC Hammer, 3rd Bass, Leaders of the New School, and (more recently) Drake sampling its distinctive elements. Born in 1944 in Evansville, Indiana, Thomas gradually honed his keyboard skills and later performed with jazz legends Donald Byrd and Cannonball Adderley. After a brief stint

DeepSoul, Sampled Edition: Chicago - "Street Player"

Although primarily known as a rock band, Chicago have also proved themselves as superb R&B players.
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By the late 1970s, the successful rock/pop/contemporary jazz fusion band Chicago was at a crossroads. Original guitarist, lead vocalist, and leader Terry Kath died tragically in 1978, forcing the group to rethink their sound and image. They hired guitarist/vocalist Donnie Dacus and recruited hit making producer Phil Ramone to helm the 1978 album Hot Streets, which spawned two top 40 hits: "No Tell Lover" and "Alive Again." For their followup, Chicago 13, the band and Ramone reteamed to create an album fitting the then-dominant disco sound. Critics despised the material, and longtime Chicago fans expressed horror at the group straying
For the next three columns, DeepSoul is spotlighting songs that have been frequently sampled by artists from various genres. "Take that funk inside of you / And make your body move," funk group Breakwater commands listeners. With a room-shaking beat, funky synthesizers, and blasting electric guitar, they encourage us to "Release the Beast." Originally released in 1980, the song found renewed attention when Daft Punk sampled it for their 2005 track "Robot Rock." Clearly the French DJs/producers glommed on to this lesser-known groove, as they actually altered it little for their own remake. In any case, the EDM stars shined

DeepSoul: Al Jarreau - "Mornin'"

Celebrate the singer's legacy through classic tracks such as this perfect blend of jazz, pop, and soul.
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On the same day as the Grammy Awards, the music community suffered a great loss. Al Jarreau, a gifted artist that seamlessly blended jazz, pop, and R&B, passed away February 12 at the age of 76. The only vocalist to win Grammys in the jazz, pop, and R&B categories, Jarreau never stopped exploring different musical genres while maintaining his distinctive singing style: rapid-fire scat and using his voice as a percussive instrument. Even when he charted crossover hits such as "We're in This Love Together" or even the Moonlighting TV theme, he never lost sight of his jazz roots. Such

DeepSoul: George Michael - "One More Try"

He may have been best known for pop, but the singer/songwriter/producer had deep roots in R&B and even hip hop.
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On Christmas Day, Generation X mourned the loss of George Michael, the pop wunderkind who first achieved fame as one half of the duo Wham! then launched an extraordinarily successful solo career with his 1987 album Faith. While predominantly known as a pop artist, few may recall that Michael stayed true to his blue-eyed-soul roots throughout his 1980s and 1990s heyday. Gifted with an incredibly supple voice, Michael could hold his own with Aretha Franklin and Mary J. Blige while occasionally covering songs by one of his idols: Stevie Wonder. On Faith, Michael displayed his deep love of soul through

DeepSoul: Prince - "Another Lonely Christmas"

Only Prince could have composed a Christmas song encompassing sexuality and sorrow, accompanied by a breathtaking guitar solo.
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It seems only fitting that Prince should grace the final DeepSoul of 2016. Fans around the world mourned his untimely loss earlier this year, and continue to celebrate his vast legacy. Few may recall that Prince released a Christmas song in 1984: "Another Lonely Christmas," the B-side to the "I Would Die 4 U" single. This being Prince, however, the song hardly conjures images of smiling carolers or chestnuts roasting on an open fire. Instead, the lyrics chronicle a man mourning his lover's Christmas Day death. In an interview with NPR, Prince biographer Touré called "Another Lonely Christmas" an example

DeepSoul: Colonel Abrams - "How Soon We Forget"

Dance music fans are mourning the loss of a house pioneer.
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House fans are mourning the passing of Colonel Abrams, a 1980s club favorite whose best known hit remains 1985's "Trapped." In 2015, Abrams was found living on the streets suffering from diabetes; DJs (most notably Chicago house architect Marshall Jefferson) set up crowdfunding sites to raise money for his medical treatment as well as a possible comeback album, but he sadly passed from diabetes complications on November 24. It is indeed an unfortunate ending to a once promising career, as Abrams burned up dance floors with his deep, powerful voice and pounding beats. While "Trapped" may be his most famous

DeepSoul: Solange - "Cranes in the Sky"

No longer "Beyoncé's younger sister," Solange finally finds her voice in this instant classic.
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One of 2016's most outstanding -- and surprising -- releases is Solange's A Seat at the Table. Previously best known as Beyoncé's avant-garde younger sister, Solange had recorded two albums and an EP; all received mixed to positive reviews, but failed to equal the impact of her older sibling's work. A Seat at the Table changes this dynamic, as Solange establishes her unique voice not only vocally, but lyrically. Like Beyoncé's recent album Lemonade, Solange's work addresses African-American identity and specific issues concerning women's self esteem. Through her Minnie Ripperton-esque voice, Solange sounds both fragile and strong, laying herself bare

DeepSoul: Mystic Merlin - "Mr. Magician"

The funky, pre-acid jazz track also marks the debut of one of the 1980s' most successful R&B vocalists.
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Mystic Merlin may be a soul-funk group, but they may be better known for launching the career of a 1980s hitmaker. Originally a band that incorporated magic tricks into their live shows, Mystic Merlin eventually focused strictly on their brand of sophisticated funk. On their final album, they recruited an unknown singer to provide the lead vocal on the track "Mr. Magician." The struggling vocalist, Freddie Jackson, had departed the group before the album Full Moon was even released. But Jackson would soon enjoy a run of hit singles such as "You Ae My Lady," "Nice N Slow," "Jam Tonight,"

DeepSoul: The Cadillacs - "Gloria"

This 1950s doo-wop group pioneered combining soul and pop to reach mass audiences.
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Soul music has produced so many subgenres including doo-wop, its close harmonies still impacting acts such as Manhattan Transfer and Pentatonix. The 1950s act The Cadillacs were pioneers of the tradition, introducing soul to wider audiences with their smooth harmonies and heartfelt delivery. While best known for their 1955 hit "Speedo," the gorgeous ballad "Gloria" perfectly represents the doo-wop genre's unique blend of lush vocal arrangements, soul, and just a touch of jazz. The Cadillacs began in New York's Harlem in the early 1950s under a different name: The Carnations. Teenagers Earl "Speedy" Carroll, LaVerne Drake, Robert Phillips, and "Cub"

DeepSoul: The Spellbinders - "For You"

The vocal quintet may have released only one album, but the 1965 single remains an underrated soul gem.
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What do the 1960s R&B group the Spellbinders and disco have in common? "For You," the Spellbinders' biggest hit, boasts a producer/songwriter who is today best known for the 1975 dance classic "The Hustle": Van McCoy. "For You" was a modest hit, and the Spellbinders released only one LP before splitting in the late 1960s. This 1965 soul confection, however, is an unfairly negelcted track that merits more attention. Founded circa the early 1960s in New Jersey, the Spellbinders consisted of Robert Shivers, James Wright, Ben Grant, McArthur Munford, and Elouise Pennington. Little is known about the Spellbinders except that

DeepSoul "Behind the Scenes": Rod Temperton

He may have a low-key presence, but the songwriter is responsible for some of the most iconic songs of the late 1970s and 1980s.
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You may know hits such as Heatwave's "Always and Forever," Michael Jackson's "Rock with You" and "Thriller," Patti Austin and James Ingram's "Baby Come to Me," and Michael McDonald's "Sweet Freedom." What you may not know is one person is responsible for penning all of these 1970s and 1980s classics: English-born Rod Temperton, the Heatwave member who became one of Quincy Jones' chief collaborators. Temperton's ear for disco, funk, pop, and jazz attracted numerous artists in all categories, making him one of the most important--and underrated--tunesmiths in modern music. Born in Cleethorpes, England in 1947, Temperton loved music from an

DeepSoul "Behind the Scenes": Kashif

A pioneer of modern R&B, Kashif's multi-genre sound paved the way for New Jack Swing and dance/hip hop fusion.
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Kashif may not be a household name, but he virtually defined early 1980s R&B. His blend of layered vocals, smooth keyboards, and modern beats appealed to both pop and soul audiences, and set the stage for musical potpourri genres such as New Jack Swing. Born in Brooklyn, NY in 1959, Kashif endured a rough childhood. Both parents died when he was quite young, and he subsequently endured abuse in a variety of foster homes. Music was his salvation, however, and keyboards became his chosen instrument. His first break occurred at 15 years old, when he joined B.T. Express (best known

DeepSoul "Behind the Scenes": James Mtume

Remember the 1983 hit "Juicy Fruit"? Writer/producer James Mtume was the man behind that song, but he also worked with R&B's most sophisticated singers.
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One of the classic early 80s R&B hits, "Juicy Fruit" has been sampled by numerous hip hop artists, most notably the Notorious B.I.G. (1994's "Juicy"). The group, Mtume, scored several soul hits until their 1986 breakup, but founder James Mtume boasted an impressive resume both before and after the group as a musician, songwriter, and producer. He co-penned and produced hits for major artists such as Phyllis Hyman, Donny Hathaway, Stephanie Mills, Teddy Pendergrass, R. Kelly, and Mary J. Blige. While he made his name as an R&B dynamo, Mtume brought a jazz background to the genre. Born to legendary