Recently by Gordon Hauptfleisch

Break out the reverb, the tremolo, echolettes, and the whammy bar dips. “Wipeout” on the “Pipeline” to the Link Wray power chord and the Duane Eddy twang. And while you can cue stars like usual suspects Dick Dale and the Ventures, there’s also a surf guitar starman in an unusual suspect, David Bowie’s guitar-god persona from his 1972 album The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. Though his “snow white tan” may not survive a day on the beach, Ziggy’s “screwed up eyes and screwed down hairdo” still work their magic, and may even
There’s no people like show people, and there’s no one showier than Broadway force of nature Ethel Merman. Her powerhouse wallop of precise pitch and clearly enunciated mezzo-soprano voice – said to have been enhanced in part by a tonsillectomy during her early career – facilitated her stage success in the days before microphones. The brassy and irrepressible Merman, who never had a singing lesson, was her own amplification, a trait that allowed her to better emulate the performances of such idols as Fanny Brice and Sophie Tucker, who she had watched and revered as a girl at the vaudeville
There’s no people like show people, and there’s no one showier than Broadway force of nature Ethel Merman. Her powerhouse wallop of precise pitch and clearly enunciated mezzo-soprano voice – said to have been enhanced in part by a tonsillectomy during her early career – facilitated her stage success in the days before microphones. The brassy and irrepressible Merman, who never had a singing lesson, was her own amplification, a trait that allowed her to better emulate the performances of such idols as Fanny Brice and Sophie Tucker, both of whom she had watched and revered as a girl at
The Ethel Merman Disco Album There’s no people like show people, and there’s no one showier than Broadway force of nature Ethel Merman. Her powerhouse wallop of precise pitch and clearly enunciated mezzo-soprano voice – said to have been enhanced in part by a tonsillectomy during her early career – facilitated her stage success in the days before microphones. The brassy and irrepressible Merman, who never had a singing lesson, was her own amplification, a trait that allowed her to better emulate the performances of such idols as Fanny Brice and Sophie Tucker, who she had watched and revered