Recently by J. Newcastle

Mylo Xyloto's strong start and finish provide enough of what casual listenerss expect from a Coldplay album. I should say from the outset of this review I am a casual listener. I locked into them with the single "Yellow" but I havent' acquired any of the the other albums until this one. I have listened to several other singles and generally like most of what Coldplay does. I have expectations with Coldplay: heavy piano/keyboard riffs, Chris Martin's vulnerable yet earnest vocals, soaring guitar melodies that fall somewhere between George Harrison and U2's The Edge, and lots of cymbals in the percussion.
Mylo Xyloto's strong start and finish provide enough of what casual listens expect from a Coldplay album. I should say from the outset that I'm a casual listen to Coldplay. I locked into them with the single "Yellow" but I havent' acquired any of the the other albums until this one. I have listened to several other singles and generally like most of what Coldplay does. I have expectations with Coldplay: heavy piano/keyboard riffs, Chris Martin's vulnerable yet earnest vocals, soaring guitar melodies that fall somewhere between George Harrison and U2's The Edge, and lots of cymbals in the percussion.
I "discovered" the Old 97s in 1999 through the brilliant album Fight Songs. It wasn't until the next year I started working through the back catalouge and it was another year before a friend and bandmate put their first studio album in front of me, 1994's Hitchhike to Rhome. And buried on that record at spot 13 is today's song in question. What begins as a plodding two chord saunter quickly devolves into an upbeat, sweat drenched ramble about the end guy on the wrong end of being used in a relationship. In a mix of country backbeat, rocking guitar
"Hell No, I Ain't Happy" from 2003's Decoration Day feels as raw as your hands after a day of pulling weeds from around the oak trees in the middle of June when it's usually 95 degrees or hotter.   The tune hooks you in immediately with a sound drenched in sweaty, gritty set guitar chords that rumble underneath Hood's vocals which go from desperate to piercing in fast succession. On a side note, this is one of the best elements of Drive-By Truckers - the ability to mix three guitar parts which aren't necessarily playing things differently but not have
"Hell No, I Ain't Happy" from 2003's Decoration Day feels as raw as your hands after a day of pulling weeds from around the oak trees in the middle of June when it's usually 95 degrees or hotter.   The tune hooks you in immediately with a sound drenched in sweaty, gritty set guitar chords that rumble underneath Hood's vocals which go from desperate to piercing in fast succession. On a side note, this is one of the best elements of Drive-By Truckers - the ability to mix three guitar parts which aren't necessarily playing things differently but not have
Sometimes the easiest answer is the best one - just climb in and let's go. That's the best way to sum up this 2006 tune from singer-songwriter Griffin House. It is as simple and beautiful as it is sentimental and earnest. With a sound that comes from a mix of Ryan Adams, John Mellencamp, and a little Radney Foster "Live To Be Free," the seventh track on his Homecoming CD, sounds like a note left on someone's windshield or tacked on their apartment door. And in that note is the invitation to let go of your fears and just
Springsteen’s '90s work often gets mixed reviews from his fanbase but this tune is the crown jewel of that period and stands up with his best work. From the opening G-Chord through the gospel-choir tinged builds, ripping guitar solos, and soulful verses, “Human Touch” is a ride on Springsteen’s train through a tapestry of life, love, loss, and moving forward. The song’s story is about a man laying it all on the table without pretentions because there’s no point in them. It’s not about sex; that’s the easy road interpretation and in fact, I think it’s refuted in the song’s

Listening Room: "Naked" by Goo Goo Dolls

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"Naked" from trash punk turned Top 40 alt-rockers Goo Goo Dolls is one of the best songs about addiction I've ever heard. By the time Goo Goo Dolls got around to recording the album Boy Named Goo, the band was at odds with their drummer and record label which more than likely fueled this emotionally charged set list. Many of you know the Goos for the smash hit "Name" and for "Iris" (which came a few years later) and pretty much every other ballad-type song they've laid on the public in recent years. There are several great spots on the
"Crazy About You" is the perfect love song for the men of Generation X. Perhaps there are other notable entries in the category but few capture the reversed-gender politics, disillusionment, yet earthy soul like this tune from the pen of Ryan Adams. Most of you know of Adams’ early work with the group Whiskeytown. By the time the Pneumonia record came around, Whiskeytown was largely done with changing line ups and record company upheaval. However, buried on that brilliant (though uneven) album is "Crazy About You." "Crazy" displays much of what makes later Ryan Adams albums Gold and Love Is
“Crazy About You” is the perfect love song for the men of Generation X. Perhaps there are other notable entries in the category but few capture the reversed-gender politics, disillusionment, and yet earthy soul like this tune from the pen of Ryan Adams. Most of you know of Adams’ early work with the group Whiskeytown. By the time the Pnemonia record came around, Whiskeytown was largely done with changing line ups and record company upheaval. However, buried on that brilliant (though uneven) album is “Crazy About You”. “Crazy” displays much of what makes a later Ryan Adams albums Gold and
I doubt many of you have heard of folk singer-songwriter John Gorka and those who have probably despise anything from the Out of the Valley record because it was a marked departure from Gorka's earlier (and more prevalent) oeuvre. Be that as it may, Valley's lead track still rings of lifted spirits and rounded optimism sixteen years after its release.  "Good Noise"  has a clear, simple theme: it’s better to focus on what you have, what you are thankful for and espouse that than to use your words to talk "down your fellow man" as Gorka wrote it. For Gorka,